Trans-Sylvania Mountain Bike EPIC- Stage Five & overall results

May 27th, 2019

Written by: Jen & Anthony Toops

The final stage of the 2019 Trans-Sylvania Epic, Bald Eagle, was the fastest and shortest of the event with 2,376ft of climbing in 22.5 miles.  Today was the last chance for racers to make moves to secure their GC positions. 

Jeff Rupnow fighting to make moves in GC position

The day started from camp and was routed mostly through trails around the scout camp.  Previous rain left some very swampy areas for riders to navigate.  This stage would also have one of the most technical and fast enduro sections of the entire race, and would claim a few riders before the day was over.

Men’s Open

Bishop trying to hold Lewis from gaining any time on stage 5

The men’s race was full gas from the gun.  Bryan Lewis threw attack after attack to try and dislodge Jeremiah Bishop and take the GC.  Gaps would form and Bishop would crawl back, never letting Lewis out of his sight. 

Lewis trying to pull away from Bishop

Bishop, who only had a 30 second advantage going in to the day, had to cover every move with that small of a lead.  The two would come to the line neck and neck with Lewis edging out Bishop by 1 second with a time of 1:23:40, to Bishop’s 1:23:41.  Kerry Werner rounded out the podium with a time of 1:28:59.

Werner staying upright on a slippery downhill

Women’s Open

Dixon fighting to hold on to her GC position

The length of todays stage would not be helpful for Marlee Dixon’s assualt on the GC lead of Britt Mason.  The two were never more than a minute apart all day.  Dixon kept the pressure on Mason from start to finish.  In the end Britt Mason finished in 1:46:36, less than 30 seconds ahead of Marlee Dixon at 1:47:01, and Emily Werner was third with a time of 1:52:20.

Emily Werner gets 3rd on stage 5 and her first podium finish of TSE
Stage 5 highlights from Dirtwire TV

For stage five results CLICK HERE

Overall 5 day Men’s Open results:

1st Jeremiah Bishop 10:43:09, 2nd Bryan Lewis 10:43:48, 3rd Kerry Werner 11:06:43, 4th John Petrylak 11:43:00, 5th Luke Hlavenka 12:15:10

Overall 5 day Women’s Open results:

1st Britt Mason 13:37:07, 2nd Marlee Dixon 13:42:22, 3rd Julia Thumel 13:57:54, 4th Bryna Blanchard 14:32:59, 5th Emily Werner 14:33:49.

Overall results CLICK HERE


TSE will return in 2020 for it’s 10th Edition! The five day race will be May 21-25, 2020 with the three day option being held May 23-25, 2020.

Registration will open August 1, 2019!

Photo credit: @iconmediaasheville & @bruceBuckley

Trans-Sylvania Mountain Bike EPIC- Stage Four

May 26th, 2019

Written by: Jen & Anthony Toops

Stage 4 of the 2019 TSE Epic once again started from the scout camp, after yesterdays remote location.  The Tussey mountain stage is notorious for its near non-stop technical rock gardens.  This is a stage where mechanical problems can make or break your race.  Line choice is crucial to keeping your tires healthy and drive train in one piece.  The 3,274ft of climbing in 32.9 rough miles was going to be a test.

Single-speeder Joe Worboy working his way through the rocks

Men’s Open

The lead pack up the tough climb on Tussey

Some drama just after the start would see Bryan Lewis playing catch up from a flat front tire after the first double track descent.  He was able to plug it quickly, but would enter the climb up the Tussey single track in around 8th position.  Lewis would end up catching the lead duo of Bishop and Werner about half way through the Tussey ridge line. 

Bishop leading stage 4 through one of many technical rock gardens

The lead pack focused on riding smooth through the rock gardens, avoiding any problems.  Lewis and Bishop would end up getting a gap on the chasing Werner going back up another Tussey climb.  These two would ride together until a tough single track climb where Bryan Lewis would attack and cross the line just 15 seconds ahead with a time of 2:08:36, Bishop was 2nd at 2:08:51, and Kerry Werner 3rd at 2:13:00

Stage 4 results: 1st Bryan Lewis, 2nd Jeremiah Bishop, 3rd Kerry Werner

Women’s Open

The general classification was tested on today’s stage with a new winner and a new face on the podium.  The top three would start the day riding together but soon Britt Mason would open a gap on the chasing pack. 

Britt Mason powering up a rocky climb

Near the 3 bridges trail section, Marlee Dixon would pass Mason for first place.  Mason was suffering from a slow tire leak which she would have to deal with before finishing the day.  Dixon would hold that lead to the finish and gain back 3:30 on GC with a time of 2:40:31.  Britt Mason managed to hang on with the mechanical issues for 2nd at 2:44:01. 

Marlee Dixon looking smooth through the rocks.

Amelia Capuano had a solid ride in the difficult trails of Tussey to grab her first podium spot in 3rd at 2:44:53.  Julia Thumel would finish just a few minutes back in 4th at 2:47:43.

Amelia Capuano gets her first podium spot taking third for stage 4
Stage 4 results: 1st Marlee Dixon, 2nd Britt Mason, 3rd Amelia Capuano

For stage four results CLICK HERE

Photo credit: @iconmediaasheville & @bruceBuckley

Trans-Sylvania Mountain Bike EPIC- Stage Three

May 25th, 2019

Written by Jen & Anthony Toops

Race director Ryan Fulton leads out the race in R.B. Winter State Park.

Stage 3 had racers traveling to nearby R.B Winter state park for a fast 30.4 mile day with 2,727 ft of climbing.  This would be the only stage not starting from the scout camp.  Perfect weather and trail conditions made for a fast day.  After yesterdays queen stage, this would be an easier day for racers, but a harder day to make up precious GC seconds. This was also the start of the three day race option.

Miki Razo navigating the mossy east coast rocks

Open Men

With the fast conditions today, the leaders would end up staying together for almost the entire stage.  Brian Lewis was determined to get some time back on Bishop and would make a few attacks throughout the stage, but nothing would stick. 

Jeremiah Bishop (Team Topeak) with Bryan Lewis (Cutaway) holding his wheel.

A few miles out from the finish is a 2 mile climb where the elastic would finally snap and Lewis was able to make the gap stick, crossing the line to gain back 40sec on GC with a time of 2:06:40.  Bishop would finish 2nd at 2:07:20.  Werner was 3rd with a time of 2:09:38.  This was the GC order as well after 3 stages of racing.

Kerry Werner (Kona/Maxxis)
Stage 3 Results: 1st Bryan Lewis, 2nd Jeremiah Bishop, 3rd Kerry Werner

Open Women

The news of the day would be that overall leader, Carla Williams, would not take the start line due to the injuries she sustained on stage 2.  This would mean a shift in the overall with Britt Mason taking the leaders jersey going in to the day. 

Britt Mason (Joe’s Bike Shop)

The racing would be close all day with only a few minutes separating the top three.  Mason lead at the start with Marlee Dixon and Julia Thumel hot on her heels.  All three were within site of each other for most of the stage.

Julia Thumel (Race Pace Bicycles)

  Mason would end up holding her lead to the line with a time of 2:35:37.  Dixon and Thumel would trade places about 10 miles from the finish with Thumel taking 2nd in 2:36:33, and Dixon 3rd at 2:38:04.  With Williams out, the GC standings are Britt Mason 1st, Marlee Dixon 2nd, and Julia Thumel 3rd. 

Marlee Dixon (Pearl Izumi/Pivot Cycles)
Stage 3 results: 1st Britt Mason, 2nd Julia Thumel, 3rd Marlee Dixon

For stage three results CLICK HERE

Stage 3 Highlights from Dirtwire TV

Photo credit: @iconmediaasheville & @bruceBuckley

Trans-Sylvania Mountain Bike EPIC- Stage Two

Written by: Marlee Dixon & Jen Toops

May 24, 2019

Coopers Gap was Stage two of the Trans-Sylvania Mountain Bike Epic and was the biggest day of the week with thirty-five miles and about five thousand feet of elevation gain. The day started on the road as racers left camp and headed into Rothrock state forest. The course included some road/gravel sections and the dreaded still house climb but was mostly all single track with trails including: linger valley, peep and deer tick. Some exhilarating descends on the course included: long mountain, sassafras and no name. It was a beautiful warm sunny day for a long day on the bike.

Emily Hairfield and Gordon Wadsworth in the Duo Category

Men’s Open

Jeremiah Bishop (Team Topeak) isn’t afraid of getting muddy on the sloppy decent.

Bryan Lewis (Cutaway) charged hard at the start of stage two and Jeremiah Bishop (Team Topeak) was able to hold his wheel while Kerry Werner (Kona/Maxxis) fell off the lead group. After Bishop had to stop for a stick in his spokes he thought he had been dropped by Lewis on a downhill. Unfortunately Lewis took a wrong turn and bishop was able to make a break away before going into Deer Tick trail.

Bishop took the stage 2 win in a time of 2:54:21. Bishop goes into Stage 3 with around a 90 second lead in the GC. Lewis finished the stage in 2:55:57 and Kerry Werner third 3:05:43 and both holding their positions in the GC.

Women’s Open

All smiles from Britt Mason (Joes Bike Shop)

In the womens race, Carla Williams (CarboRocket) had a lead of over ten minutes starting stage two. After an unfortunate wrong turn and a crash, she finished the stage in second with a time of 3:54:08; still holding on to the GC lead.

After an unfortunate wrong turn, Williams finishes stage two in second but still holds onto lead in the GC.

Britt Mason (Joes Bike Shop) rallied back after her rough start on day one and made up some time on the technical downhills. She took the stage win finishing in 3:49:33 and moving into 2nd in the GC. Marlee Dixon (Pearl izumi/ Pivot Cycles) finished the day in 3rd in 3:57:01. Dixon moves into 3rd in the GC.

Stage two highlights from Dirtwire TV

For Stage two results CLICK HERE

Photo credit: @iconmediaasheville & @bruceBuckley

Trans-Sylvania Mountain Bike EPIC- Stage One

After the TSEpic was canceled in 2018, the race has been brought back thanks to the new race director Ryan Fulton of Trans-Sylvania Productions. The TSE is held in Spring Mills, PA at a local scout camp aka “Single track Summer Camp”, where the trails are know for their rugged east coast rocks. Racers can choose between a 5 or 3 day race and are allowed to camp for free.

Stage one of the TSE was Poe Valley and started from camp. Racers climbed 3208 feet in 30 miles. The weather was a perfect cool sunny day until the skies opened up on some of the racers. It was a mix of rocky old school singletrack and gravel roads with beautiful vistas.

Men’s Open

Brian Lewis made several strong attacks on stage one.

In the open men category a leading group formed of Kerry Werner (Kona/Maxxis), Bryan Lewis (Cutaway), Jeremiah Bishop (Team Topeak) and John Petrylak (Endeavor Cycles/ESI). Bryan Lewis made several attacks throughout the stage. Jeremiah Bishop was able to bridge the gap on the last attack near the finish. Lewis and Bishop rode the last several miles together until it came to a sprint at the finish. Bishop took the stage win with a time of 2:08:54:26, Lewis came in second at 2:08:54:38, and Werner took the third spot in 2:09:21.

Jeremiah Bishop (Team Topeak) on the hunt for the stage win.

Women’s Open

Carla Williams (CarboRocket) taking the win for stage one of TSE

In the open Womens category, Carla Williams (CarboRocket) took the lead from the start and continued to gap the other women on the first climbs and gravel sections . She held the lead until the finish crossing the line in an impressive 2:28:36. Behind her, Marlee Dixon (Pearl Izumi/Pivot Cycles) pushed hard but had some mechanical issues on the technical singletrack finishing 2nd in 2:39:43. Just a minute back and taking third place, was Julia Thumel at 2:40:36. Britt Mason (Joes Bike Shop) started strong but after a flat she finished 4th in 2:41:18. This is a very competitive field with 4th-6th place all within minutes of the podium and should be an exciting race to follow this week.

Marlee Dixon (Pearl Izumi/Pivot Cycles) on her way to 2nd place.
A rainy end to stage one.

For full stage 1 results click HERE

Written by: @jentoops

Photos: Bruce Buckley

Titan Tropic Stage 1

December 4, 2016

Titan Tropic by GAES Stage 1 – Havana to Soroa

The first serious day of riding finished after riding 97 kilometers from the urban and historic city of Havana to the relaxed mountain resort of Soroa. In observance of the final day of mourning for former Cuban leader Fidel Castro today’s stage was a transfer stage only, meaning no official time was kept.

Riders are given 2 liters of bottled water at the beginning of each stage. Tap water in Cuba cannot be trusted.

Riders are given 2 liters of bottled water at the beginning of each stage. Tap water in Cuba cannot be trusted.

Tucked into the mountains we chased for about half the day, Soroa is known as the “Rainbow of Cuba” for it’s natural beauty and the Orquideario Soroa park, which is home to 700 orchid species from around the world.

Bike racks are full prior to stage 1.

Bike racks are full prior to stage 1.

Today’s stage started with several miles of road transitioning to a jumbled mix of pavement and dirt cane field roads. The pavement sections could barely be called roads as the mammoth potholes littering every stretch made life difficult for the riders and prevented pack riding in groups larger than 4 or 5.

Jen working with our group through 10-foot-tall sugarcane fields.

The second half of the race featured primarily dirt roads only with some primitive trails that would pass for singletrack throwing in some small river crossings and rocky climbs leading to the finish.

We started off slow as burning matches on an untimed stage seemed stupid. As the day went on temperatures started to rise and with the wind blowing hard at 20-30 mph. Our gameplan changed as limiting our time in the heat and holding on to our drafting partners suddenly rose in importance.

We chased the mountains in the distance for most of the day before finally catching them at the very end.

After just over 4 hours we finished without any major issues although we spent most of the day worrying about stray dogs, goats, or cows wandering onto the roads and weaving around atomic potholes.

Once across the finish line, the stress immediately stopped and the chilling began with a distinct Carribean feel. Palm trees, great food, and lounging near the pool was the order of the afternoon.

Farms and children greeted us around every corner

Farms and children greeted us around every corner

Tomorrow’s stage starts and ends in Soroa. Stage 2 will be the first real racing of Titan Tropic. We don’t know what to expect from our competition but today gave us a nice introduction to riding as a team again and the course markings and feed zones of Titan Tropic.

Tomorrow’s stage will be a 106 km loop bringing riders back to Soroa after completing a tour of several hydro-electric dams, fertile crop fields, and some technical riding including a 300-foot rocky climb to the finish line.

 

 

 

 

Titan Tropic Pre-Race Report

Titan Tropic by GAES – Pre-race Report

The moment we learned about Titan Tropic we knew it would be an unforgettable experience. Now add in the death of Fidel Castro and the experience just ramped up to eleven. It’s hard to imagine a more historic time to be in Cuba.

The flight to Cuba was itself an experience. After more than 50 years of travel ban from the US to the largest island in the Caribbean boarding a commercial flight in Miami and landing in Havana just 45 minutes later is something few Americans have experienced since JFK was president.

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Leaving the high rises, glitz, and glamour of Miami and in less than an hour you’re transported to a different time, flying over unmaintained dirt roads winding between fields full of ox and cattle before touching down at Jose Marti International airport, disembarking on the runway, and catching a cab that’s most likely a late 50s Chevy makes you feel like you’ve been transported back in time. While just 90 miles south of the United States, Cuba feels light years away.

Titan Tropic has already been a unique experience and we haven’t even started racing yet.

All of Cuba is currently observing a period of mourning following the death of their former leader and this will continue until December 5th. For Havana that means the rollicking nightlife it’s become known for is on hold but promises to resurface when riders return to the capital city on December 9th.

We have still been able to visit the city and take in the incredible culture and architecture of Havana, which dates back to the 16th century.

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Havana is also known for it’s many artists and art instillations including the home of Jose Fuso. Fuso is a Cuban treasure who opens his private home for visitation and you can tour the neighborhood he has rebuilt with glittering mosaics.

And of course we have been awestruck by the American cars from Dodge, Plymouth, Oldsmobile, Ford, and Chevy dating back to the 1940s and 50s when owning a car was more than just a mode of transportation but a statement about the driver. The cars alone are worth a trip to Havana.

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The Titan Tropic organizers have had to make some changes in observance of the mourning period and that includes canceling the prologue day and stage one will be neutralized as well but the racers will be riding the entirety of the stage without logging an official time.

The real racing starts with stage 2 with riders making a loop around the mountain resort town of Soroa, known locally as the “rainbow of Cuba” for it’s unsurpassed natural beauty.

My wife Jennifer Hanks and I will be competing as a mixed duo team. According to race rules we must ride within 2 minutes of each other throughout the race and can help each other along the way. For us that usually means me carrying all the food and tools, keeping Jen light and fast on the climbs. This will be our fourth team event and we seem to work pretty well together with each knowing their partner is trying their hardest at all times.

We will do our best to keep everyone updated on the race throughout the week as our internet availability allows.

In the days to come there are many incredible experiences in store for all the riders as the race takes in torrential river crossings, Unesco World Heritage sites, tobacco fields, tree rats the size of a house cat, majestic white sand beaches and much more.

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Descriptions of the 5 stages of Titan Tropic are below:

The race starts in Havana. Usually with a 30km untimed prologue around the city taking in all the sights including the Malecon, Revolution Square, and the Plaza de Armas. Unfortunately, the prologue had to be canceled in observance of the official mourning period following the death of Fidel Castro.

Titan Tropic’s first stage, 89 kilometers from Havana to Soroa, will also be neutralized as the final day of mourning. However, racers will ride the full distance without logging an official race time.

Following their first night of tent camping in Soroa riders will ride the following day for the first official competitive stage of the 2016 Titan Tropic.

This stage will be a 106 km loop bringing riders back to Soroa after completing a tour of several hydro-electric dams, fertile crop fields, and some technical riding including a 300-foot rocky climb to the finish line.

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Stage 3 is the longest of the Titan Tropic at 119 kilometers and perhaps the most scenic taking the race from Soroa to Vinales. This stage includes multiple large river crossings, mountain climbs as steep as 18%, and the unique mogotes (haystack-shaped limestone mountains) of Valle Vinales which make it a Unesco World Heritage site.

Riders will camp here overnight before taking on stage 4, Vinales to Vinales, of 84 kilometers. Known as the Queen Stage of Titan Tropic, Vinales to Vinales, is completely off-road and reportedly the most difficult of the race.

The fifth and final stage takes riders 86 kilometers from Vinales to Cayo Jutias, a white-sand key on the northern Atlantic coast of the island. Despite being named for the giant tree rats that inhabit the islands mangroves, Cayo Jutias is a jewel of the northern coast of Cuba and protected for it’s singular beauty.

Click Here for a Full Start List for the Titan Tropic.

Check back with MTB Race News for updates throughout the week.

Breck Epic Stage 3 Report

BRECKENRIDGE, Colorado

(Uncommon Comms.)

The third day of the Breck Epic saw the riders tackle the second-longest course of the week, circumventing the massive Mt. Guyot. Men’s overall race leader, Todd Wells (SRAM-Troy Lee Designs) and teammate Russell Finsterwald distanced themselves from the others on the second climb of the day —the decisive Georgia Pass—and they never looked back. “On the second climb, it’s a really steep one and it’s rideable all the way to the top,” said Wells. “It’s one of those things where you don’t attack or anything, you just push whatever gear you can sustain and we rolled off.”

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By the time Wells and Finsterwald reached the rock gardens at the bottom of the descent off Georgia pass the duo had about five minutes over third place rider Chris Jones (Unitedhealthcare Pro Cycling). At the finish, the lead duo had a nearly seven-minute gap.“First legit mountain bike podium ever,” said Jones at the finish. “Well, I’ve only done like six races ever, but I think if I’m on the podium with Todd and Finsterwald, that’s a pretty legit podium, right? We’ll call it dumb luck. I was okay going up Georgia Pass, but I don’t have the skills those guys do [on the steep climbs] where you’re just kind of balancing and if you unclip you have to run. That’s where those guys got away. They rode a section, I had to walk it, and I never saw them again.”

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While the leaders had dry conditions for most of the day, the majority of the field dealt with driving rain on the climb and descent of Georgia Pass. Many riders dealt with flats early on, including Clif Bar teammates, Troy Wells and Ben Sontag. Sontag was able to repair his flat with a plug, but Troy Wells’ who suffered his flat early in the stage, got shuffled back in the field and lose a chunk of time.

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ON RIDING WITH FINSTERWALD

“You know when you’re descending and you’re at a comfortable pace? ”Asked Wells. “You’re going fast, but it’s what you feel comfortable at. I was going just over that the entire day, so I couldn’t even enjoy those descents. I was always looking forward to the climbs so I wouldn’t have to worry about crashing into a tree. You know, we have a decent lead now, but with stage race mountain bike, anything can happen. You can lose an hour. Two hours. Break a wheel and have to walk five miles. “It’s not over until the finish,” added Finsterwald.

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In the three-day Epicurio us, Bryan Dillon (Topeak-Ergon), added to his lead with a win on his third and final stage. “Today is a fun stage. It really gets into the true Breckenridge style of rocky-riding and hike-a-bikin’, but it’s super fun,” said Dillon. “Being up on Guyot that time of day and looking back down on the valley, it’s just righteous.”

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WOMEN’S PRO/OPEN 6-DAY

The Women’s 6-Day Open leader, Amy Krahenbuhl, added to her lead with her elevated level of technical riding on the technical descents of stage three. Ksenia Lepikhina (Tokyo Joe’s) was in second 10-minutes back, and Emma Maaranen (Rolf) was another four and half minutes back of her. “[Lepikhina] was behind me at the start of the first climb, but after that I was hanging out with boys and using that as motivation, said Krahenbuhl of Lepikhina.

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“Today I finally felt like my legs were strong. I really like the day after day cycling, so I felt like today I finally got my legs and I’m going to keep with it.” “Absolutely beautiful to go up and over the Continental Divide,” continued Krahenbuhl. “Everyone was in great spirits and having a great time. On the downhill everyone was hootin’ an’ hollarin’. There was great energy out there.” With stage four being the longest of the week and almost 8,000 feet of climbing, there will be plenty of good times for the race leaders and those just enjoying the high-mountain singletrack, alike.

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Full Results from the stage here: (Stage 3 Results)

Tran-Sylvania Epic Stage 4

Stage 4 win boosts Werner into leader’s spot at NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic

Armstrong claims women’s stage victory while Barclay defends overall lead

TRANS-SYLVANIA, PA (June 2, 2016) – Stage 4 of the NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic was a wet and wild ride at R.B. Winter State Park, a mainstay of the event with some new trails and more miles added for this edition. A steady rain through most of the day encouraged some riders and hindered others.

Elite men

With its high speeds, smoother trails and wet weather, stage 4 turned into a more tactical battle for the top men. Kerry Werner (Rally Cycling) raced his way into the lead of the general classification by virtue of winning the stage and finishing as the top enduro rider on the day. Previous leader Justin Lindine (Apex / NBX / Trek) dropped to second overall after finishing second in the stage and third in the enduro.

Justin Lindine (Apex / NBX / Trek) started stage 4 of the NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic as race leader, but ended it in second place on both the stage and in the GC after a challenging day. The men’s race proved to be extremely tactical with three of the favorites battling it out for most of the stage.

Justin Lindine (Apex / NBX / Trek) started stage 4 of the NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic as race leader, but ended it in second place on both the stage and in the GC after a challenging day. The men’s race proved to be extremely tactical with three of the favorites battling it out for most of the stage.

Previous third overall racer Adria Noguera Soldevila (Buff Pro Team) initially led a group of four top favorites, including his teammate Pau Zamora, Werner and Lindine. However, an unfortunate flat after the first enduro section would eventually cost Soldevila more than 30 minutes on the stage.

That left a highly motivated Zamora with Werner and Lindine. “I often was at the front so I could make up time on the other riders and get a top-three today,” said Zamora.

Werner was happy for the extra company up front. “Pau was being a trooper and taking good pulls with us. He wasn’t the best descender although he’d get in front for some of the enduro segments,” said Werner. “I think his motive was to slow us down so we wouldn’t get away from him.”

Cyclocross pro racer Dan Timmerman (Riverside Racing) is no slouch when it comes to mountain biking. He’s been mixing it up among the top five of the solo men at the NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic, and sits in fourth overall after stage 4.

Cyclocross pro racer Dan Timmerman (Riverside Racing) is no slouch when it comes to mountain biking. He’s been mixing it up among the top five of the solo men at the NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic, and sits in fourth overall after stage 4.

Zamora’s strategy worked well until a steep climb just before the fourth of five enduro segments when Werner seized an opportunity. “I’d never seen the trail before, but I had scoped it out on Strava and saw that it was wicked steep for 0.1 miles,” said Werner. “Pau swung wide on the right turn into it, and I chopped him inside and took over the lead ahead of him and Justin. I made it three-quarters of the way up the slick rocks before having to run, but the others had to run the whole thing after Pau slipped out. I led into the enduro segment, got a bigger gap and then went full gas to the finish which felt much further away than it had looked on the course map.”

The enduro riders were clearly having at least as much fun, if not more, than everyone else all week. Here, Cory Rimmer (Kona / Nox Composites / Provision Sports Medicine) demonstrated the preferred enduro line. He and enduro classification leader Cody Phillips (Ibis Cycles Enduro Team) have ridden together for most of the week thus far.

The enduro riders were clearly having at least as much fun, if not more, than everyone else all week. Here, Cory Rimmer (Kona / Nox Composites / Provision Sports Medicine) demonstrated the preferred enduro line. He and enduro classification leader Cody Phillips (Ibis Cycles Enduro Team) have ridden together for most of the week thus far.

“Kerry’s move was a good one,” said Lindine. “When we popped out on the road after the enduro segment, I could see him, and it became a pursuit match. I closed what was 35-40 seconds down to maybe 20 seconds at the finish.”

“Today was a hard day – a bit of a disaster for me from a GC standpoint,” said Lindine. “Unbeknownst to us, the enduro guys were having a terrible day, so their times on some of the enduro segments were slow. Neither Kerry nor I pushed it on the enduros today, but Kerry ended up first, and I was third in the day’s enduro classification, so due to the enduro time bonuses, I lost even more time to Kerry. Maybe I rode too conservatively today, but when you’re on the rivet, you don’t want to make a move and have someone counterattack it.”

It was a stellar day for Kerry Werner (Rally Cycling), who moved into the lead of the solo men’s general classification in stage 4 of the NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic. He leveraged a strategic move going into the fourth of five enduro segments to grab a stage win.

It was a stellar day for Kerry Werner (Rally Cycling), who moved into the lead of the solo men’s general classification in stage 4 of the NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic. He leveraged a strategic move going into the fourth of five enduro segments to grab a stage win.

With one minute separating Werner and Lindine, Friday’s final stage 5 will decide the race. Lindine knows well from his own past experience that one minute isn’t a big gap and anything could happen to change the race’s outcome.

Stage 4 Brief Results

  1. Kerry Werner (Rally Cycling)
  2. Justin Lindine (Apex / NBX / Trek)
  3. Pau Zamora (Buff Pro Team)

General Classification After Stage 4

  1. Kerry Werner (Rally Cycling)
  2. Justin Lindine (Apex / NBX / Trek)
  3. Pau Zamora (Buff Pro Team)

Enduro Stage 4 Brief Results

  1. Kerry Werner (Rally Cycling)
  2. Cody Phillips (Ibis Cycles Enduro Team)
  3. Justin Lindine (Apex / NBX / Trek)

Enduro Classification After Stage 4

  1. Cody Phillips (Ibis Cycles Enduro Team)
  2. Kerry Werner (Rally Cycling)
  3. Justin Lindine (Apex / NBX / Trek)

Elite women

Kaysee Armstrong (Liv) added climbing power to her descending prowess to earn her first stage win of the race. “This morning I wasn’t feeling super motivated, but then when we headed up the road climb, all the ladies were together, so I thought I’d dig a little deeper,” she said. “When I did, I felt really strong. So I thought, ‘Let’s just try to get to the first enduro as fast as possible.’ But then the rain started coming down, and I was like — oh, today’s my day. I loved every bit of it.”

Kaysee Armstrong (Liv) took her first NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic stage win of the week, beating women’s GC leader and race favorite Vicki Barclay (Stan’s NoTubes Elite Women’s Team). Armstrong’s performance was good enough to bump her up from third to second in the women’s GC.

Kaysee Armstrong (Liv) took her first NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic stage win of the week, beating women’s GC leader and race favorite Vicki Barclay (Stan’s NoTubes Elite Women’s Team). Armstrong’s performance was good enough to bump her up from third to second in the women’s GC.

Armstrong is quite familiar with racing in the rain. “I race a lot in Pisgah where it rains a lot like that, so it worked out in my favor.” She now sits solidly in second place in the GC, as well as the enduro classification, and continues to take each stage one at a time.

Overall race leader Vicki Barclay (Stan’s NoTubes Elite Women) did not pull away from the pack as she has on other days, but she still held on to her lead and her good attitude. “I had some mechanical issues today…those slowed me down,” she said. “But it’s good for me to have days like this, because it challenges me to push through. I had to work to get back up into second place. It was rough. I’m actually feeling a little bit grumpy. But Kaysee rode an amazing race and even before I was having problems, she was crushing the climbs.”

Vicki Barclay (Stan’s NoTubes Elite Women’s Team) had a challenging day despite weather that was more like that of her native Scotland; however, the pink-clad race leader successfully managed to defend her overall lead with one stage to go in the NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic.

Vicki Barclay (Stan’s NoTubes Elite Women’s Team) had a challenging day despite weather that was more like that of her native Scotland; however, the pink-clad race leader successfully managed to defend her overall lead with one stage to go in the NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic.

Stage racing allows one to wipe the slate clean and start fresh each day. “Tomorrow’s another day… I’m just hoping to hold onto the GC win,” Barclay said.

Bryna Blanchard (Windham Mountain Outfitters) also had a strong day that resulted in third place. “I surprised myself that I could maintain that pace for that amount of time. I did everything I could and am satisfied with my ride. I was proud to be able to ride with Selene Yeager (Emmaus Bad Decisions Club).” Yeager is a past winner of the race who is riding on a team this year.

Blanchard had no illusions about the coming final effort. “Tomorrow’s going to be harder than today, a lot harder. I think I have to just not go to that dark place and try to stay focused on every section.”

Stage 4 Brief Results

  1. Kaysee Armstrong (Liv)
  2. Vicki Barclay (Stan’s NoTubes Elite Women’s Team)
  3. Bryna Blanchard (Windham Mountain Outfitters)

General Classification After Stage 4

  1. Vicki Barclay (Stan’s NoTubes Elite Women’s Team)
  2. Kaysee Armstrong (Liv)
  3. Bryna Blanchard (Windham Mountain Outfitters)

Enduro Stage 4 Brief Results

  1. Meggie Bichard (Fuji)
  2. Kaysee Armstrong (Liv)
  3. Kimberly Quinlan (Bicycle Express Racing)

Enduro Classification After Stage 4

  1. Meggie Bichard (Fuji)
  2. Kaysee Armstrong (Liv)
  3. Kimberly Quinlan (Bicycle Express Racing)

The Trails

Stage 4 of the NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic took racers to R.B. Winter State Park for some of the most picturesque riding in Pennsylvania. Among the highlights were Black Gap Trail and White Deer Creek Trail. The course’s 35.2 miles, with 4,616 feet of climbing, were fast and furious and included five enduro segments. A cold, spring-fed lake awaited at the finish – where riders could cool down and clean off the day’s mud.

Check out our daily Facebook Live coverage!

Watch our live coverage on Facebook for each stage’s start and from somewhere out on course. We also stream each evening’s post-stage slideshow, video recap and awards ceremony.

Thanks to our sponsors

The NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic presented is made possible with the generous support of great partners like Julbo, Central PA Tourism, Lupine, Purple Lizard, SRAM, Kona, NUUN, Freeze Thaw Cycles, EVOC and more!

Social media

For more information, visit OutdoorExperience.org or TSEpic.com; find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TransSylvaniaEpic; or follow us on Instagram or Twitter @TransSylvania, #TSEpic, #TSEnduro and #SingletrackSummerCamp.